Pen and Sword – Rigging – Period Fore-and-Aft Craft

 

1

 

By Lennarth Petersson

Published by Seaforth Publishing and Pen & Sword Books Ltd., First Published in 2007

© Lennarth Petersson 2007

by Chatham Publishing

Pages – 111

ISBN – 978 1 84832 218 9

MSRP – £12.99

 

In the world of modelling, more specifically ship modelling; arguably one of the more arduous tasks is rigging of the miniature replicas. When it comes to period ship modelling it is not easy to master the art of rigging let along find the information on how to create all of the various types of rigging. Model maker and draughtsman, Lennarth Petersson, has compiled the many years of knowledge of eighteenth century rigging into “Rigging: Period Fore-and-Aft Craft”.

This 111 page book is basically a mini-bible of the ins and outs to rigging three specific ships used widely within the eighteenth century fore-and-aft crafts; the British Naval Cutter, the French Lugger and the American Schooner. These ships were employed throughout the world both in the fair trades as well as in the illegal side of privateer shipping; pirating.

 

The author’s goal from writing this book was to give the reader and often the wanting ship modeler the tools to understanding the beautifully simple yet enigmatically complex art to the rigging of these smaller seagoing vessels. Essentially this book is broken down into three large chapters covering the Cutters, Luggers and Schooners I mentioned above.

Riggin – Period Fore and Aft Craft starts off with a brief introduction by the author which gives a little insight to his reason for writing the book and what he is writing about; the for-and-aft crafts. The introduction is followed by a short acknowledgement to the many people and museums that helped him on his quest in writing the book.

Each of the chapters in this book is dedicated to one of three fore-and-aft ships. Each of these chapters begins with a brief description of the ships; background and design. Each of the chapter introductions are followed by an in depth general plan layout of the ships rendered in black and white line drawings form.

These line prints is meticulously drawn, clearly legible and labeling has been added to define what the reader/modeler is looking at. A complete listing of attachment points is given for each of the ships and where the rigs and riggings are applied. The drawings are highly detailed, showing knots used sizing and all of the fashioning and fastening points throughout. These drawing were comprised from several existing period ship models still in existence. These models themselves did not have sails attached but the author has placed sail plans for each of these ships in the book as well.

 

Conclusion

 

Riggin – Period Fore and Aft Craft by Lennarth Petersson is an amazing look at the art of rigging of these smaller vessels. He does not claim to this book being the be-all-end-all when it comes to showing the rig and rigging placement on these ships, but it surely comes real close!   The drawings are intricately rendered and remarkably easy to follow and the supporting text attached to the drawings gives the reader the correct terminology for the areas highlighted.   This book is an essential guide to rigging these beautiful ships as well as an indispensable reference for rigging used on all ships. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in eighteenth century shipping and for the avid period ship model shipwright.

 

Highly Recommended

Pen & Sword

 

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One thought on “Pen and Sword – Rigging – Period Fore-and-Aft Craft

  1. Pingback: Pen and Sword Books – Rigging Period Ship Models | MSC Review Connect

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